We open with a new version of the opening titles, which feature a very brief shot of a modern day couple walking away from a car, someone driving towards a roofless Lallybroch and warlike scenes of shots being fired and bare chested Highlanders charging into battle. We are certainly not in France anymore.

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Jamie and Claire look well settled into Lallybroch, so we assume they have been there for at least several months. It was lovely to see Jamie speaking Gaelic to his baby niece, cuddling her when neither could sleep. Claire and Jenny looked on adoringly. And we cried again at the sight of Jamie with a baby in his strong arms. Oh, I can’t forget the potatoes.  Lots of them, the result of Claire’s earlier advice to Jenny that Lallybroch must be planted with potatoes to fend off a coming famine.

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A nasty surprise arrived in the post, causing Jamie and Claire much angst and making them journey to the Fox’s Lair, Jamie’s grandsire, Lord Lovat’s castle.

Jamie and Claire have a tender heart-to-heart.

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Well, the shark showed up this week. Laoghaire MacKenzie (who book fans love to call Leghair, even though they know full well how to spell and pronounce her name), somehow slid her way into Episode 208. It’s obvious Leghair still loves Jamie, she even sniffed his laundry!

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Leghair has been portrayed slightly differently in the TV series than in the book where Leghair did not give evidence against Claire in the witch trial, nor was her involvement in framing Claire so forthright. So let’s give the girl a break, maybe she HAS found God and changed her ways. Maybe I’ll even call her Laoghaire again. Ron D. Moore has stated that due to Laoghaire’s involvement in the future, they needed her to be, if not forgiven, then understood, not to be absolutely evil.

Next followed a majorly confusing story of political intrigue and jockeying for power and possession of Lallybroch.

Laoghaire also came in useful to build a contrived plot to build up the confidence of Lord Lovat’s wimpy son, Simon in order that he could man up and join the rebellion with his own army, thereby keeping Lord Lovat neutral.



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